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History

The origin of the surname van Blaricum is the village Blaricum in het Gooi, a area in the province of Noord-Holland, near the city of Amsterdam. Before the year 1800 someone was mostly known by his first name and a "patroniem" (fathers-name). In official papers this name was sometimes extended with a "toponiem" (a geographical name), being the birth place of the person. When following generations use this patroniem or toponiem as a surname, it has become a family name. In the trees III and IV you can see that a family can generate more than one family name. In tree III there are the names Gracht and Blaricum and in tree IV the names Blaricum and (probably) Lubbertsen.

During the last centuries the family-name has been written in many many ways. There are 29 different variations in the database, of which the following 8 are still in use up to the present: Blarcom, Blarcum, Blaricom, Blaricum, Blargan, Blarikom, Blarkom en Blerkom.

At this moment I know of 3 "main" trees, namely the trees I, IV and V. It is very plausible that the trees II and III are related to each other, they are based in Utrecht since the 17th century and in those days this town had only about 30.000 inhabitants. The trees VI and VII originate from tree II.

Blaricum

The oostermeent of Blaricum
The "oostermeent" of Blaricum
Drawing by Ton Veldmeijer.

The village of Blaricum was originally a settlement of farmers, living in turf huts and simple farm-houses. It was during the tenth century or probably even sooner that the first people were living in the Blaricum moorland and woodland. The living in the medieval Naerdincklandt and afterwards Gooiland consisted mostly of bringing the land under cultivation for the farming, with cattle-breeding on the common fields, keeping sheeps on the moorland, cutting sods for the cattle in the stable and sowing and harvesting of the fields. For many centuries the agrarian production was the main means of support in the villages of the Gooiland. Blaricum could keep this agrarian character until 1920 and is considered these days as the prettiest village of the district. In 2007 was Blaricum the municipality with the highest average house prices of the Netherlands.

The website of the municipality Blaricum: www.blaricum.nl

A nice website of Gerard Grootveld about the vilage Blaricum in Past and Present: http://gerardg.nl/blaricum/

Tree I (Ankeveen)

Around 1700 Jacob Hendriksz van Blarcum settles down at Ankeveen, he was probably born in Blaricum and his fathers first name should be Hendrik.

The family van Blarcum lived for years in "Het Reghthuys" at Ankeveen, with behind it large gardens. In the fifties a new residential area was build in those gardens. To remember the family van Blarcum and their influence on the village they named a road "Van Blarcumlaan" (from "Straatnamen van Ankeveen"). The last inhabitant of Ankeveen of the family van Blarcum was Christianus Joannes van Blarcum.

Tree II (Utrecht)

Although both the trees II and III are based in Utrecht, it is not yet sure, if there is a relation between them.

Tree III (Utrecht)

In 1608 is in Utrecht the marriage of Gerrit Jansz van Blaricum, also known by the name Gerrit Jansz van der Gracht, whose father has to be Jan van der Gracht, with Marrichje Herman Willems van Doorn. His occupation, and that of his son Herman Gerritsz and Lubbert Gijsbertsz of tree IV was "rademaker". Those days there was a castle in Blaricum known by the name De Graft. It was a big house that stood in the "Bouwvenen" beside the "Gooiersgracht". It is possible that Gerrits origin lies there, it should explane the existance of both surnames. His children kept the name "van der Gracht", but the children of his son Herman took the name "van Blaricum".

Tree IV (America)

De Eendracht
The Eendracht.

Lubbert Gijsbertsz was born in Holland in 1600 or 1601, because he was 33 years old when he made on 15 April 1634 a contract with the diamond merchant Kiliaen van Rensselaer from Amsterdam, concerning his coming to the new colony of the landowner: Rensselaerswijck. This colony was placed on both banks of the river Hudson near Fort Oranje (Fort Orange, now Albany, New YOrk). He became the first wheelwright and wagonmaker of the colony.

Lubbert with his wife and three children sailed to America on the Eendracht, leaving from Texel early May 1634. They arrived in Rensselaerswijck about two months later, because his account with the colony was opened on 20 July 1634. His account was closed in 1647, when they moved to Nieuw Amsterdam, where they stayed for several years. On 5 Dec. 1654 he got a Dutch patent for 50 morgen (about 100 acres) of land in Bergen Neck, NJ. Just south of him was his son-in-law Jan Corneliszen Buys with 25 morgen and then his son Jan Lubbertsen also with 25 morgen. On 15 September 1655, after an Indian had been killed in Nieuw Amsterdam for stealing fruit from an orchard, a large war party of Indians terrified Nieuw Amsterdam, across the river Hudson down to Bergen Neck and over to Staten Island. They burned the Dutch bouweries and plantations and killed or captured everyone who had not fled. It is likely that Lubbert was killed during this Indian raid, since his wife Divertje moved back to New Amsterdam without him. There she, as a widow, requested permission to tap on 1 May 1656, together with her son-in-law Jan Corneliszen Buys, alias Jan Damen.

When Lubbert Gijsbertsz arrived in America, he had three children. After that he got at least six more. It is likely that most of the children kept the surname Lubbertsen, while only the descendants of Jan Lubbertse kept the surname "van Blarcom".

After the American Revolutionary War many of the colonists who had served in the British Army or were loyal to the British ("Loyalists"), went in 1783 to Nova Scotia in Canada. Amongst them were Peter van Blarcom and his brother Hermanus.

Wars

American Revolutionary War (1775-1783)
John van Blarcom      
War of 1812 (1812-1815)
Garret van Blarcom      
Hendrick van Blarcom Captain    
Ten Days' Campaign (1831)
Johannes Petrus van Blarkom      
Mexican–American War (1846-1848)
Henry van Blaricom   Battalion of California Volunteers, Mounted Rifle, Company E 1846-1849
American Civil War (1861–1865)
A. H. van Blarcoan Private 65th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment  
Daniel J. van Blarcom Corporal 22nd New Jersey Volunteer Infantry Regiment  
Francis van Blarcom   USS Santee, frigate  
Henry van Blaricom Private 4th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company I 1864-1865
John Canon van Blaricom   75th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company I 1861-1864
Lewis van Blarcom First lieutenant, captain 15th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company D 1862-1864
Phillip Eli van Blarcom   1st Minnesota Volunteer Cavalry Regiment  
Samuel van Blarcom Corporal, sergeant 15th New Jersey Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Company D 1862-1865
William Harrison van Blaricum Private 106th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment 1861-1865
World War I (1914-1918)
Lewis van Blarcom Captain New Jersey State Militia  
Shelomi van Blaricom      
World War II (1939-1945)
Albert E. van Blaricom      
Albert Miller van Blarcom Electronics officer   -1946
Amos James van Blarcom      
Darrell J. van Blaricum Private    
Glenn Franklin van Blaricum First lieutenant   1941-1945
Levi van Blaricom Private    
Paul E. van Blaricom Coxswain 3rd Class US Seabees  
Raymond H. van Blargan   110th Tactical Reconnaissance Squadron  
Raymond van Blarcom      
Sherben E. van Blaricom First lieutenant    
William N. van Blaricum Private    
William Reeves van Blarcom   USS Design, mine sweeper 1943-1944
Korean War (1950-1953)
Earl E. van Blaricom      
Wesley Delroy van Blaricom Private US Marine Corps  
Vietnam War (1955-1975)
Howard Lionel van Blaricom Sergeant US Marine Corps  
Richard William van Blarcom Specialist 4th Class 101st Airborne Division, 502nd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Battalion, A Company -1968
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